Tip #7: Reusable Bags

If you have been keeping up with Baby Steps, you may think that using reusable bags is a given. I hope you do! But if you don’t, I’d love to give some reasons that shopping for groceries with reusable bags is a small way to make a big difference.

First, think of how much plastic you touch in a day. The first thing I touch is my phone case, to turn off my alarm. That is plastic. Then it’s my shower, my shampoo and conditioner, my clothes, my food, my backpack, my car, and so on. All of those things are encased in, touching, or made of plastic.

It’s impossible to get away from. And in this day and age, I wouldn’t expect you to. But anyone can reduce the amount of disposable plastics they use- much like our Baby Steps about using reusable mugs and water bottles pointed out. Cutting out the use of plastic bags is the next logical step to reducing plastic bags.

The polyethylene plastic bags we use to carry our meat and Reeses at Gerbes, King Soopers and Hyvee take 1,000 years to break down. And polyethylene plastic bags don’t biodegrade, they photodegrade, which means that they just break up into smaller, toxic bits of plastic that can’t be reused or recycled or even caught and contained to a pile or single area in some cases. They usually spin around in the ocean in something called the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.

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(via http://www.remarkably.com/tag/garbage/)
Unfortunately, people romanticize this garbage, and imagine a huge vortex of plastic bottles and bags, which looks and sounds scary. But the reality is even worse: the plastic spinning around in the patch has photodegraded so much, that often we can’t see it with our own eyes, and can’t pick it up with our hands. Invisible, and toxic with extremely high levels of BPA and DDE, it harms at least 267 species that we know of. Sometimes the animals eat the plastic thinking it is food, and sometimes animals hormones are altered by the chemical compounds like BPA.

Over 90% of the time, this will be their ultimate destination; the ocean. Because according to the EPA, less than 5 percent of plastic grocery bags are recycled in the U.S.

Now that you are sufficiently informed, it should be easy to make the move to reusable bags.

First, reusable bags are only a dollar each at any store, either Gerbes, Lucky’s or Hyvee.

Second, reducing the use of plastic bags isn’t even just bringing canvas totes with you. It’s also putting all of your fresh veggies in one produce bag rather than multiple. It’s not putting your gallon of milk in it’s own plastic bag. It’s filling up the plastic bags you do use, rather than keeping your meat, dairy and vegetables separate.

And it’s really being conscious that every time you use a new plastic bag, there are billions of other people doing the same thing, multiple times a day, every day. And all that plastic has to go somewhere.

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