Eating Bugs, Pt. 2: the Cicada Edition

From the Columbia Missourian by Melissa Klauda Wondering what to do with all those periodical cicadas creeping across your lawn, preparing to inundate your trees and unleash their cacophonous chorus? The answer is simple: Cook ’em up and eat ’em… Jenna Jadin of the University of Maryland Cicadamaniacs offers a Cicadalicious recipe for Emergence Cookies….

Animals cling to dry spots during Mississippi River flood

By Tina Casagrand The Mississippi River levee break at Bird’s Point put about 130,000 acres of farmland underwater, but it also flooded two state parks.  The Missouri State Parks and Historic Sites Facebook page posted this picture of Towosahgy State Historic Site on May 12. The caption reads: The site is in the New Madrid Floodway,…

Download the Earth Day issue

Footprint Magazine presents . . . the EARTH DAY ISSUE, featuring lots of sustainable living content you’ve seen here online and a new original DIY piece on how to make your own coffee table.  It’s designed by journalism design student Theresa Berens, and it looks gorgeous.  Now with this e-file you can distribute it to…

From football field to collegiate farm

By Tina Casagrand The latest Association for Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education newsletter, which highlights sustainability efforts across the nation, just published this piece of news.  I thought it was too cool to not share.  You can read more about it here and here. Paul Quinn College (TX) recently planted the first seeds in…

What’s that weed? MU Extension offers identification.

From the Columbia Missourian by David Cawthon Flowering pansies, field violets and some rose species could be a bouquet for mothers or a Missouri farmer’s worst nightmare. For people questioning what’s growing in their backyard, field or flowerpot, the MU Extension has cultivated a new interactive weed identification Web tool. The site serves homeowners, agriculture…

Mizzou campus nature quiz

By Tina Casagrand In an environmental studies course on the natural history of Missouri, Dr. Jan Weaver encourages her students to keep a daily journal of nature observations, complete with a date, location, description (including drawings, if applicable) and one or several questions about that observation. Over time, this information can be very useful for…